Nonviolence Resource Center

Essays/meditations/reflections

Center for Christian Nonviolence
Cristo, persona capturada,

Ten piedad de nosotros.

Cristo, persona interrogada,

Ten piedad de nosotros.

Cristo, persona encarcelada,

Ten piedad de nosotros.

Cristo, persona torturada,

Ten piedad de nosotros.

Cristo, persona juzgada,

Ten piedad de nosotros.

Cristo, persona que el proceso judicial declaró culpable,

Ten piedad de nosotros….

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(Rev.) Emmanuel Charles McCarthy

In case you participated in Mass on this Feast of Saint Stephen or read the official Roman Catholic readings for the Mass this day, this is just a heads-up to keep you from being misled by an intentional omission in today’s readings.

The first reading is from the Acts of the Apostles and tells the story of the martyrdom of the Nonviolent Saint Stephen, ACTS 6:8-10; 7:54-59. It concludes at VERSE 59 with the words, “As they were stoning Saint Stephen, he called out, ‘Lord Jesus receive my spirit’ ” (ACTS 7:59)...

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(Rev.) Emmanuel Charles McCarthy
War is the creation of individuals not of nations.

Churchill, Hitler and the Unnecessary War (2008)

From King David (or from one of his “best and brightest”), we hear:

Fair Babylon, you destroyer,
happy those who pay you back
the evil you have done us.
Happy those who seize your children
and smash them against a rock.

—PSALM 137:8-9

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(Rev.) Emmanuel Charles McCarthy

This mediation is a mother's pledge to and covenant with every other mother on Mothers' Day.

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Julia Ward Howe, 1870

Take a moment to contemplate the real origins of Mother's Day: the belief that women can create peace and justice through nonviolent love and community rooted in humanity rather than in geographical gangs.

The movement to set aside a day for women's peacemaking began with two women: Anna Jarvis and Julia Ward Howe. Jarvis, a West Virginia mother of 11, worked to improve rural sanitation and healthcare before and during the Civil War. When the war ended, she worked to reconcile Union and Confederate families in her state.

Julia Ward Howe, the author of Battle Hymn of the Republic, witnessed the atrocities committed by both sides during the Civil War. Howe was appalled, not only by the fatal casualties of violence, but by the other effects of war: economic devastation in both the North and the South, disease, and physical and mental disability. She devoted herself to building an international community of women creating peaceful resolution to conflicts.

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